It’s Getting Cold Out, So Garden Indoors

The leaves are falling, but you don’t have to sink into winter doldrums. You can keep up your green thumb and all the joy you get from growing with indoor plants. All that greenery inside your house is much more cheerful than the brown landscape and bare trees outside. So fill your home with green and flowers.

geranium and houseplants on table.
Fall is the time to bring geraniums, succulents and other houseplants indoors — and then find a spot for them!

Here are a few ideas on how to extend the season and ease into winter slowly.

Adjust houseplant conditions

Even houseplants that live indoors all year might need some winter preparation. This includes cutting back on watering and fertilizing and cleaning leaves to allow as much light as possible to reach the plant. Because winter days are shorter, and the sun in the northern hemisphere is lower, you might have to move plants to different windows or supplement their light with grow lights. And be sure not to overwater houseplants in winter. Most need a break to rest, and only need water when the soil dries out.

succulent arrangement
These succulents spend winter indoors near a warm wall and sunny window. We can move them around as the sun moves up or down in the southern sky.

Move container plants inside

We move inside any plant we love and think can make it at least a few months inside. It helps if it is not too heavy to move. This includes many succulents that can’t take low temperatures, geraniums, and plants that tolerate shade. We had a gorgeous coleus container we brought inside one year. It got leggy, but we were able to enjoy it for a few months more than if we had discarded it.

barrel cactus and aloe in containers
Most of our succulents can’t handle the cold winter lows in zone 6B, so they come inside for winter.

Harvest or grow edibles

Pick green tomatoes if still viable on the vine and let them ripen indoors, fry them up or make a tomato sauce starter. Making pesto is fun, but you also can cut basil branches and place in a jar of water for extended life. If canning is your thing, it feels good to prep for winter by preserving fruits and vegetables. When you miss your summer garden, visit the dark cool area where the jars of your preserved crops are stored. You can grow sprouts in glass jars to “summer up” sandwiches and salads.

herb garden vertical
This sunny room in my daughter’s house is perfect for houseplants and herbs.
chives and basil in window
You can extend the season for some herbs inside. Or look for lights and systems that help you grow herbs and microgreens all year.

Take cuttings of favorite plants

That coleus that got too big and lanky? We could have rooted new coleus plants from cuttings instead of bringing the mature plant inside. There’s a fun indoor project! In fact, try taking cuttings of favorite plants and starting them indoors. Not all plants are easy to propagate, but with some practice, you can start your own plants for the next spring.

Succulents often bloom in winter and early spring, adding color to your indoor gardens.

Buy a new houseplant

African violets can bloom almost continuously if they receive enough sun and consistent, light moisture and repotting as needed. There are thousands of varieties with different bloom colors and styles and variegated leaves. Many succulents bloom in winter (such as Christmas cactus) or in spring, when you’re really itching to get outside and grow. Both succulents and African violets also are easy to grow from leaf cuttings, though the technique is very different for each.

violet succulent
African violets and succulents are easy to start from cuttings.