Baby, It’s Cold Outside and Wildlife Gotta’ Eat

I’ve been working long hours this week wrapping up a project that’s due soon (cause writers gotta’ eat too). So I haven’t been able to research gardening topics for the blog. I’ve also had some trouble keeping my attention focused on my work task, mostly because birds and deer have been busy stocking up on food and it’s so fun to watch.

snow on rose hips
Snow on rose hips. Birds and other critters eat these in winter, and the birds congregate in our two native rose bushes.

Last week, I wrote about nurturing wildlife instead of flowers this time of year. And I have say it has paid off. Some of the grazing is natural. Deer and wild turkeys naturally roam here in winter, but I’ve never had so much fun with winter birds. We’ve got huge flocks that normally fly by now landing in trees and I have to stay really disciplined to keep from pulling out a book or bringing up my Cornell Merlin Bird ID app to identify them.

The apricot tree is up above the bath and feeder. We normally saw these flocks fly overhead, but yesterday, they circled and landed in the tree. There were 40 or so at once, and I believe most are Lazuli buntings.
The apricot tree is up above the bath and feeder. We normally saw these flocks fly overhead, but yesterday, they circled and landed in the tree. There were 40 or so at once, and I believe most are Lazuli buntings.

When I need to get up and stretch, I peek through the windows at the activity, watching the birds and deer and trying to get photos without disturbing them. I thought I’d share a few this week, then try to get my head back on gardening — and the holidays, of course — next week. I’ll also keep my eye out to get a photo of the latest spotting. I believe it’s a sharp-shinned hawk, who’s attracted not so much to our feeder, but to the small birds around it.

I'll get back to the birds, but check out this buck. He is solid! So gorgeous.
I’ll get back to the birds, but check out this buck. He is solid! So gorgeous.
One of the tiniest fawns I've seen around here came with the latest herd. This one is still fluffy, and not much taller than the bird bath!
One of the tiniest fawns I’ve seen around here has joined the growing herd. And that’s good, because our deer population was affected by a wildfire several years ago. This one is still fluffy, and not much taller than the bird bath!
I believe this is a dark-eyed junco, but am not certain. I call it Ambitious.
I believe this is a dark-eyed junco, but am not certain.I call it Ambitious.
And successful!
And successful!
The scrub jays chase away lots of other birds and each other. But I love how the couples stick together.
The scrub jays chase away lots of other birds and each other. But I love how the couples stick together.
Birds gotta' drink too. And bathe. It has gotten a little crowded at the bath.
Birds gotta’ drink too. And bathe. It has gotten a little crowded at the bath.
We're even getting action on the thistle sock.
We’re even getting action on the thistle sock.

Nurture Birds Instead of Flowers in Winter

Surely, one reason gardeners in cold climates get a little depressed in winter is that we can’t get outside as much. Another reason is that we aren’t growing and nurturing plants. At least I discovered that’s happening to me, because I’m kinda’ trying to grow birds instead.

bird on suet and nut feeder
This is one of my new obsessions. A Pyrrhuloxia, a cardinal-like bird who showed up just before Thanksgiving. The tuft on his head reminds me of Woody Woodpecker. He is so fun to watch! I hung this new feeder more for convenience than protection, but he checked it out the first day.

We’ve always had some birds in winter. Living in a semi-rural location bordered by a river and national forest brings some pretty interesting birds. For example, a solo sandhill crane flies east and west over the river each day, and sometimes lands behind our place. Only once have we seen two cranes.

This year, I have been spending lots of time birdwatching. OK, bird obsessing. Just switching to better bird food helped, and we saw several birds this year we’ve never seen before.A Northern Flicker decided to roost up under one of our beams. I know the bird naturally perches on the side of trees (or buildings apparently), but watching the poor thing huddle into a corner during 25-degree nights broke my heart.

northern flicker on house
I can’t get close to the skittish Northern Flicker. There are three of them on our property. This one claimed our bedroom patio.

I ordered a house specially designed for flickers from the National Wildlife Federation. Tim mounted it in the same corner. The first night, the bird perched near or on the house. By the second night, he checked in. And I check every night to make sure he returns. Just a little obsessive.

Northern flicker bird house
Here’s the Northern Flicker house from the National Wildlife Federation. It’s perfect. Tim mounted it tightly against the corner the flicker was sleeping in (and pecking at), and it took only one night until he checked it out and headed inside. He’s taken up permanent residence.
northern flicker near house
Told you I was obsessed. I spotted our buddy yesterday around lunch time again. You can see his house up to the right. Now that I have the house, I would like a telephoto lens for my Nikon, please?

Now, I’ve moved on to some new winter feeders and other ideas. And I’m having to force myself to pay attention to work during the day!

Leaving birds some shelter, food and water in winter is the right thing to do. And as I was writing this post, I found out that today is World Wildlife Conservation Day. Knowing my efforts give birds a boost in winter helps me justify the expenditure and time. Here are a few tips for keeping birds fed and watered so they can make it through cold and dry winter seasons:

  • In winter, birds need fat and energy to make it through the cold nights. Frankly, I have a feeling a few are regretting settling down in our community this year. Seriously, by going about 40 miles east or west, I imagine their nights would be 5 to 10 degrees warmer. Nuts, suet and fruit provide fat and energy, and black oil sunflower seeds are a year-round preference for many birds.
ice on bird feeder
It gets cold here! This was over Thanksgiving weekend. It took the birds a few hours to man up and hit the feeder.I’m not sure if any made their way into the birdhouse next door.
  • Quality of seed makes a difference. It’s not only better for the birds that stop by, but should bring more birds and more varieties of birds. When we have run out and had to buy seed at big-box stores, I’ve found way too many twigs among the seeds. Plus, much of the selection in inexpensive seed mixes gets cast aside and lands on the ground, making a big mess.
  • Buy the seeds with no hulls to avoid that big mess. The ladies at Wild Birds Unlimited in Albuquerque told me I’d get some different varieties by using hulled sunflower seeds instead of seeds with hulls, and they were right on! Some birds, such as dark-eyed juncos, can’t break open seed hulls. The seeds are well worth the money and actually last longer. So efficient!
bird feeder with sunflower seeds and pigeon guards
Here’s the ice-cold bird diner filled with sunflower seeds, no hulls included. Notice the pigeon guards, also from Wild Birds Unlimited, which work and were well worth the price.
  • Better-quality and no-hull seeds also help keep away nuisance birds. Sorry, but I can do without mourning doves, or as I call them – pigeons. I thought we got rid of them when we left the city. But apparently, they followed the U-Haul. One way to keep them off the feeder is with pigeon guards. With no hulls on the ground, they won’t even gather at the feeder area.
sign about doves
I knew I could taunt my husband with this some day. Unless an ornithologist corrects me, my research (and this wonderful sign from a Maui botanical garden) confirm it: Mourning doves are pigeons!
  • Winter suet attracts birds that don’t eat seed, such as jays, bluebirds, woodpeckers and nuthatches. It costs less than peanut butter, maybe even if you make your own feeders. But if you enjoy making feeders with kids or grandkids, having lots of choices and spots for birds is good for them and fun for you! Suet cakes can go in cage feeders, or more protective wooden ones. Suet also comes in logs, or if you have lots of time on your hands, you can walk out each morning and smear it on a tree.
  • I like to purchase nonmelting suet because some of our winter days get warm and spring can be whacky, with really cold days and nights that alternate with warm days.
  • Our finches tend to disappear in winter, but I left out a sock filled with niger, or thistle, seed that I had just filled before it turned cold. I’ve seen a few finches and sparrows on it.
  • Some articles suggest ground feeders, but I am too concerned about attracting critters (including my dogs) with the seeds to try that one. Next year, I would like to find a spot for a platform feeder, however. I guess some birds can eat while swinging around, but there are some that do better with nuts and fruit on a nice plate, such as cardinals and jays. I’m hoping they’ll try standing on top of my stackable feeder and pecking on some nuts and cranberries!
WIld Birds Unlimited Flying Start feeder
Our Pyrruloxia found the suet and nut feeder yesterday and tried a bite. He’s back in the garden this morning, distracting me while I try to write about him.

Finally, birds need water all year long, and it’s hard to come by anywhere that nights dip below freezing. It’s especially tough in places like New Mexico, where water is scarce as it is. Birds need drinking water and to splash around for feather maintenance (check out a bird pool party I filmed and placed on Instagram). Those feathers keep them insulated at night, and I want them to stay healthy. Our river is running full and fast, but I don’t think there are pools of water down there for small birds. Our bird bath has been a big hit, but it has frozen over every night for several weeks. I’m wasting water when I toss the frozen chunk, and I don’t like to waste water. Heated bird baths or electric or solar heaters to place in the bird bath are available now. I’ve asked for a solar heater for Christmas, so more on that later. If anybody wants to send me a free one to try, please feel free to do so. The birds and I would be so grateful!