Looking Up in the Garden

 

trees-and-skyWhen you tour botanical gardens or private gardens, do you ever look up to see what’s above your head? Most of us plan our gardens while sitting on our back patio or strolling through its paths. Often, we choose plants simply because we see them at a nursery and love their flowers. There’s nothing wrong with that, but one day soon, take a look at your landscape from the point of entry, such as the gate to your backyard, and walk around,  considering the overall look from ground level to tree canopy.

You might be pleasantly surprised, and you can add interest and beauty to  your garden by considering what goes on over your head. I recently toured several gardens in the Denver area and noted use of arbors and other design elements to add height and 360-degree interest to landscapes. Here are a few examples.

Decks and Patios

Al you need are a few containers and some “engineering” skills to garden vertically, so to speak. Here are some of my favorite examples.

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We all love a few containers on the deck or patio, but floor space is limited, right? Jim Borland, co-host of Ask the Garden Pros on Denver radio station EZ 1430, has “looking up” down to a science.
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Here’s a totally different style of plant for a different style of home. These giant fuchsias hang from baskets on the front porch of Kirsten and Scott Hamling’s home in Denver.
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I love the ingenious ways Denver-area homeowners have for hanging baskets. This fun collection hangs from overhead at the home of Dan Johnson and Tony Miles of Englewood, CO.
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And a little whimsy always helps. Jim Borland has a container with grass hanging on his back patio. I am not sure how he mows it…
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The prize for most containers in a yard, not just in Denver, but maybe anywhere, goes to Rob Proctor and David Macke. They have more than 600 containers — filled with healthy plants. Rob is a garden expert, author, lecturer and TV personality in Denver. I love these pink petunias up the steps.

Arbors and Pergolas

Some plants are just born to trail up, down or around. With a well-placed arbor, you can add height, shapes, color and materials to your garden. Most of all, you can display some beautiful climbing plants that double as shade-makers.

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Such a pretty structure that draws your eye up and shows off bright pink roses. This was one of many highlights in Carol and Randy Shinn’s garden in Fort Collins, CO.
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This wooden structure in Jan and Richard Devore’s Fort Collins garden is natural and unobtrusive, helping your eye see the climbing branches and foliage.
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Even more natural are these twisting, shady treetops, also in the Devores’ large backyard.
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Another great thing about looking up: Southwest skies. This arbor at the Denver Botanic Garden provided shade, plant support and a peek at the gorgeous clouds.
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This beautiful arbor at the Johnson-Miles garden looks great from the bottom up.

Mix up Plant Heights

Finally, don’t be afraid to add tall trees or other natural elements right in the middle of your garden. I always worry I have to place the tallest plants in the back. But breaking the “rules” can be fun and a hit.

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The Shinns had a gorgeous mix of dry river beds, native plants, roses and other ornamentals in their front yard … and a giant tree as a focal point for the 360-degree view.