How to Ensure a Dog-Friendly Landscape

Our loyal, furry family members love being outside, and it’s important to keep them safe from dangers that lurk in back yards. It’s especially important on larger properties and in rural areas. Here are a few tips on making your landscape more dog friendly.

Dave HIggins Jack russell
Buster gotta’ play. Dogs need to be safe and have some space to run. Photo by Dave Higgins.

Poisonous plants. Lots of gorgeous and native plants can poison dogs who ingest leaves, fruit or seeds from the plant. The Humane Society has a list of plants poisonous to pets so you can check it against your garden. For example, the pods of a bird of paradise bush can poison dogs, as can daffodil bulbs and entire iris plants. Larkspur, oleander and Sago palms also have poisonous elements. Jimson weed, a common xeric weed/wildflower, also is poisonous.

Jimson weed poisonous dogs
Jimson weed (Datura) is poisonous, but the worst offender is its large seedheads.

The best way to protect dogs from poisonous plants is to avoid planting them. However, some grow naturally or are favorites. If the seeds are the dangerous part of the plant, gardeners who own dogs and want a particular plant in their garden must be vigilant about removing seedheads as they appear. It also helps to place plants with noxious leaves or flowers in the back of a raised bed or a fenced-off garden area. The level of protection depends on whether your dog spends time outside unattended and often, the dog’s age and curiosity level.

Chemicals. Controlling weeds and bugs in the garden sometimes means pulling out herbicides and pesticides. Even some organic control methods can pose dangers for your canines. For example, organic compounds such as nicotine or pennyroyal are toxic to dogs. Our dogs also love (for some reason) to eat soil after we use fish emulsion and similar organic fertilizers. Some of these can be toxic if enough is ingested. The other danger is that they attract dogs to potentially toxic plant materials or pesticides; for that reason, don’t mix fertilizers with pesticides.

dogs in chair jack russels
And some spoiled dogs get to sit in a patio chair. They can see better, but we also can keep an eye on them.

Animal droppings. As I said, our dogs have refined tastes. And a virtual four-acre buffet of animal droppings. Sometimes, droppings contain diseases, and horse manure can contain de-wormers that are toxic to dogs if ingested in large quantities. The other problem is dental health. Naturally, munching on other animals’ manure causes dental problems from bacteria. And their breath… enough said. I wish I had a solution. In smaller lawns, it’s important to clean up droppings from cats or other visitors. We can only correct or distract our dogs when we catch them in these behaviors.

jack russells
Yep, they’re a team, and that includes getting into things they shouldn’t when outside.

Weeds. Some weeds can cause allergies in or hurt the paws of our four-legged friends. Out West, one of the biggest culprits is the foxtail. The seed from the weed/grass has barbs that latch onto a dog’s face, feet or tail. The seeds migrate and can burrow into the dog’s ears or internal organs, causing serious infection. Ragweeds and other plants might cause severe itching or reactions. And the weed of the month here is the goathead. It’s also called puncturevine, and I can attest to the pain from the sharp points on the seed heads. They really hurt dog paws, and are especially problematic for running dogs. We’re trying to hoe them up (thousands!) before they get large and go to seed, but I know we’ll miss some.

goat head weed
Goatheads. Thousands of goatheads with awful puncturing seedheads. It’s best to hoe or pull them while small and before they flower.

Critters. Dogs are curious about more than poop and fertilizer. And that means they need to be protected from critters, especially at night, dusk and dawn. We’ve had stray dogs, skunks, squirrels, feral cats, deer, elk, wild turkeys, eagles, roosters, rabbits, bull snakes, cows and even a peacock in our yard. There are plenty others I imagine I never see. Although most people around here allow their dogs to roam, we choose to protect our little mutts. It’s not cost-effective to fence our entire property (not to mention that doing so keeps out deer and turkeys), so our solution is a small kennel. When we’re gone and the dogs need relief or a reason to bark, they can head out a small dog door and into a 10 x 8 kennel. It might seem cruel to give dogs so little space, but not if they also get regular exercise and attention. There are few days when ours fail to get outside at least twice and explore under our supervision. It’s true that critters can enter dog doors, but the high fence adds an additional layer of protection.

dog door and kennel
This pet door in my office window lets the mutts out into a small kennel; we placed steps on both sides.

Of course, there is so much more involved in keeping dogs safe and happy outside, such as ensuring they have shade in summer or warmth in winter and water all of the time. And dogs and kids need a little turf for playing, even in drought-stricken areas. The best way to keep dogs safe from poisons, critters and other injuries is to fence them. Absent that, monitor their activity. Sure, they sometimes take off when excited by a deer or rabbit. But a little training and use of the right word and tone can usually stop them in their tracks. Besides, why have a big yard if you can’t enjoy it with your pets? And if you have a small yard, check out this article on a new trend for some pet shelters – dog enrichment gardens.

dogs need shade
Missy stays close at all times. She’s enjoying some lazy shade time while we prune plants in the xeric garden.