Grow This Easy Vegetable: Cherry or Grape Tomato

Growing tomatoes can be loads of fun, but a little stressful in dry climates with short growing seasons (aka: where we live). But cherry and grape tomatoes have a shorter time to maturity and harvest, and work well in nearly any zone. I believe they also are subject to fewer problems because the fruits are smaller and ripen quickly.

Late-season tomato harvest, including Burpee grape tomatoes.
Last year’s late-season tomato harvest, including lost of grape tomatoes.

The other benefit of small tomatoes is their adaptability to containers, so you can add a cherry tomato to your convenient patio or kitchen garden. The fruit is smaller than a typical tomato, and usually so is the plant. Having said that, all tomatoes grow tall and wide, and a cherry tomato can easily reach 5 or 6 feet high.

We had both red and grape tomatoes in the large container on the left. Food or decor? Both!
We had both red and grape tomatoes in the large container on the left. Food or decor? Both!

Better than Candy

I can’t think of many plants better suited for getting your family excited about growing their own food. When children can walk up to a plant on their patio or yard, pluck the fruit and pop it in their mouth, they’re bound to appreciate the flavor, freshness and fun of growing juicy tomatoes.

Grape tomatoes ripening on the vine late in summer.
Grape tomatoes ripening on the vine late in summer.

Last year, we grew red and yellow grape tomatoes (Solid Gold yellow grape tomatoes from Sakata) and Tim ate them like candy. Maybe that’s why some of the varieties we’ll try this year have “candy” in their name. One is a tricolor tomato from Renee’s Garden. Each individual plant yields either yellow, red or orange cherry tomatoes, and I need to find a way to try all three. The seeds come color-coded to give you and your family a choice.

We can’t wait to try Tomato Candyland Red from Pan American Seed. Candyland was a winner of the culinary delights All-America Selections for 2016. It’s called a currant tomato and the fruit is even smaller than a cherry tomato. I love it — no cutting necessary. According to AAS, the fruit forms along the outside of the plant, making it easier to harvest.  And you can expect up to 100 or more tiny tomatoes from each plant. If you sow the seeds indoors and transplant Candyland Red, you should have fruit in less than 60 days.

AAS 2016 winner tomato red candyland
All-America Selections Candyland Red Tomato (Currant)
Image courtesy of AAS.

Although we’re trying out these fun and delicious selections, we’re keeping our main vegetable garden strictly organic. We’ll add Matt’s Wild Cherry tomato from High Mowing Seeds, which also has fruit smaller than most cherry tomatoes and matures in 55 days. The seeds are certified organic. These are perfect for containers, since the mature plant only reaches a height of about four feet.

Tips for Growing Cherry Tomatoes

These really are easy plants for beginning gardeners or busy families. They’re sort of like the gateway vegetable to bigger tomatoes, beans, cucumbers… and certainly a plant and food you’ll get hooked on. Here are a few tips for growing tomatoes:

  • Check the final width and height of the plant you choose when selecting a container. As far as I’m concerned, the bigger the container, the better. I’ve underplanted marigolds and basil with mine. The basil was not as pretty as the garden herb, but it produced and fewer insects went after it.
  • As for insects and other pests – they still can attack cherry and grape tomato plants, but a container sometimes provides an extra layer of protection. I caught a few snails making their way up the container, but none made it to the plant. The deer left all of mine alone until late in the season when they munched on a few in one of our gardens. Having tomatoes in a container close to the house can help. We did get tomato hornworms on our container grape tomato, so if you see stripped leaves, start looking.
hornworm droppings
Telltale signs of hornworm activity were easy to spot on the patio.
  • Plastic containers work better than clay ones, which dry out too quickly. Glazed containers also work well and turn an edible into an ornamental.
  • Cherry and grape tomatoes still need some help with cages or some sort of trellis they can climb on to make sure the plant has air circulation and support branches as fruit develops. You can put cages into containers or place the plant along a fence or trellis. Just make sure it gets plenty of air if against a solid structure.
cosmos and tomato
Why not support a tomato plant with wildflowers? This plant grew over a short wall and rested on the cosmos.
  • One of the best ways to ensure healthy tomatoes is with consistent watering. In other words, try to give the plants the same amount of water applied slowly or by drip each time you water, unless of course it rains.
  • Tomatoes need at least six hours of sun a day, so plant them in a south-facing location unless you’re in a really hot zone. We moved our containers to follow the sun. At first, we gave the plants a little extra shade while they finished hardening off. Once hardy, they got more sun. And if they looked stressed in the heat of summer, we moved them a few feet to improve afternoon shade.
candyland red seedlings
Our Candyland Red seedlings look gorgeous and healthy.
  • Seeds are easy to start inside with light and moisture. But be sure to pot up your seedlings to strengthen them before planting.
perfect grape tomato
P stands for “Perfect,” right? I have no idea how the perfectly formed letter appeared on this grape tomato, but it tasted delicious!

Cherry and grape tomatoes are perfect for snacking and salads. If you really want a tomato that you can slice into and need to grow in a container or have a short season, aim for a cocktail size. We had excellent luck growing a short-season variety last year called “Fourth of July” (from Burpee) in a container.