Savoring Succulents Without Busting the Budget

New gardeners and homeowners or office dwellers with little time can enjoy live plantings with easy-care succulents and air plants. And who knows? Once bitten with the bug, it’s so easy to move on to flowers, herbs or vegetables.

cacti in thrift store container
Three cacti in a Haeger Pottery container. Tim found the container in a local thrift shop; the plants were about $2 each.

There are so many attractive succulents and cacti to choose among, and their colors vary. Many also flower. But they typically come in tiny plastic containers or expensive arrangements. We’ve spent some of our winter “down time” playing with these low-water lovers. Tim has propagated new plants from cuttings, but they eventually need attractive containers as well.

cacti succulents houseplants
Because you just can’t have enough cacti and succulents… This photo shows a few inexpensive, handmade containers.

We’ve bought some containers and repurposed others. In fact, I might not have enough for patio herbs this spring; I think they’ve been swiped. But we’ve also had a lot of fun making and finding containers. If you have a creative streak, you can have a lot of fun with cacti, succulents and air plants because the plants are so low maintenance.

air plants
I love the look of these tillandsias, or air plants. No soil needed!

Here are a few inexpensive container ideas:

Hypertufa. The trend in making hypertufa pots is popular for a reason. They’re relatively inexpensive to make, and although they can look like stone or concrete, the containers are much lighter. Hypertufa is a mix of Portland cement, sphagnum peat moss and perlite. There are lots of recipes online, and we often save plastic containers or other objects to use as molds.

inexpensive succulent containers
Three hypertufa pots we made, along with a “planter” made from an old fence post.

Thrift stores. It’s much more fun to browse a thrift store when you have an idea or purpose in mind. We purchase inexpensive baskets for hypertufa molds (the baskets can’t really be used again) and containers for air plants or cacti. It’s fun to find rustic or unusual items in particular.

wine glass air plant
I had fun with my thrift store find. I put decorative glass beads around a small plastic cylinder stuffed with sphagnum moss. It took less than 20 minutes.
thrift store containers cacti
This one’s our favorite. We bought what appears to be a candleholder and then found the perfect spiny cactus for its “seat.”

Reuse and repurpose. You can buy empty air plant terrariums fairly inexpensively online, or come up with found objects. I’ve used old coffeemaker pots, small mason jars and other objects from our kitchen or closets. Tim has used an old jelly jar layered with sand and moss to create a tiny succulent planter. And fence posts, drift wood, rocks, shells, pinecones and other natural items found in your yard or on walks can work well as planters or decorative items. Air plants can even be glued to wood or other items; you’ll just have to spritz them with water a few times a week instead of soaking the “roots.”

sedum in old wood
Found objects also add interest outdoors. An old post with barbed wire intact sets off this sedum.
airplant terrarium
These terrariums are inexpensive. We like to add decorative rocks and objects from our yard or garden.

Although some succulents need fairly regular watering, the biggest mistake we’ve seen people make with cacti and succulents is overwatering. That takes only a little practice to get right for each plants. The other helpful tip from Tim is the growing medium.

You might think that cacti in particular grow in sand, especially if you’re ever been to Arizona.  A little sand helps containers drain, but you need some other growing medium to give the plant some nutrients and retain just enough moisture for the roots to seek and find. You can buy commercial cactus mixes, but most include peat moss. Tim believes his plants do better with less moss. He mixes his own medium of about half cactus potting soil, with some vermiculite and sandy soil from areas of our yard. This seems to support the plant while also providing drainage.

pink cactus flower
In this case, the cactus was found on family land in southeastern N.M. Tim kept some of the dirt he found it in for the growing medium. And why not? It was thriving in its natural location.

It can help to drill a drainage hole in any container you make or find, but it’s not always necessary with cacti and succulents, especially if you have a large or deep container and good potting mix. The real satisfaction is in coming up with a unique container or arrangement, matching the cactus to the container or the container to a plant you really like.

blooming cactus houseplant
A close-up of our spiny chair. Tim added a few decorative rocks to complement the planter’s color. We knew it had buds, but the blooms were more than we expected.

For more about cacti and succulents, check out our Pinterest board.