Getting Crafty With Plants

Since there’s not much we can do outside until after the first of the year, weather permitting, I’m playing with plants indoors. And it’s been fun, because we’ve made a few gifts from plants we’ve grown or by combining plants with other found objects. It’s way more fun than shopping and I won’t even get into how I feel about Christmas and commercialism this year.

air plant terrarium
Combining air plants with found garden objects, we made an inexpensive air plant terrarium as a gift.

I hope recipients enjoy the handmade gifts as much as I enjoy making them, because that’s what the holidays should be about. And maybe my attempts at being crafty with plant materials will inspire ideas in others.

Air Plant Arrangements

My daughter expressed the desire for some easy-care plants and showed me examples she really liked while we were catalog browsing over Thanksgiving. Never one to disappoint, I ordered a pack of three air plants from Juicy Kits and had fun making a few terrarium arrangements to give Rebecca and Dave for Christmas. I’m counting on her being way too busy to check my blog before I see her.

All three Juicy Kits air plants were easy to arrange.
All three Juicy Kits air plants were easy to arrange.

We already had a few mini-terrariums left over from another project; they seemed perfect for this one. We lined them with some decorative rock and then added objects we’ve saved or found out in our rock garden, including black rock, a shiny red stone, dried wood and a piece of shed deer antler Tim found in the yard. We added sphagnum moss, and I even colored some with green food coloring.

air plant terrarium in coffee pot
The coffee pot still has writing, but we enjoyed using objects from our place, including a piece of shed deer antler.

We placed one air plant in an old coffee pot. It didn’t look as good as I’d hoped, but I love how the top pops up, and it’s a bit of a private joke because our guests used to go through the tiny coffee pot on their first cup in the morning. If anyone knows how to get the writing off of the side, I would love advice! We tried combinations of a razor blade, Goo Gone and CLR. I ran out of patience, so I hope they get the joke. But we liked the arrangements enough that we decided they only need two and we’ll keep one (sorry, kid). We’ll enclose Juicy Kit’s care instructions in the gift bag.

Lavender Sachets

Since we decided to plant more lavender – the perfect xeric plant – I’ve been trying out ways to use the aromatic herb. This year, women in our family get a lavender sachet filled with dried buds and leaves from our garden. Drying and harvesting the lavender was the easy part of the project, and it was a great use of the stalks I wanted to leave on the plant longer so we could enjoy them in our garden. If you harvest lavender for wands or arrangements, you have to cut it earlier, before the buds fully flower.

Lavender bunches even look gorgeous when hanging to dry in an old shed.
Lavender bunches even look gorgeous when hanging to dry in an old shed.

For sachets or potpourris, you can simply run the flower stalks back and forth between your fingers, catching the buds in a large container. I did most of this outside on a sunny fall day. Then I stored the buds in an airtight container until I could fill the sachet bags.

Dried buds come off easily by simply rolling stalks between your fingers. Have a large container handy to catch them.
Dried buds come off easily by simply rolling stalks between your fingers. Have a large container handy to catch them.

I ordered the muslin bags and stamp set online. It was an easy project to complete, but the muslin didn’t take the fabric ink as well as I’d hoped. Next year, I’ll try a soft cotton. The lavender smells magnificent! I’m having to keep the sachets packaged in zipped bags until gifting them or the scent might mix with some manly beef jerky or white work socks in our gift pile. Can’t have that.

These aren't fancy, but they come from our garden and the heart. Oh, and they smell wonderful!
These aren’t fancy, but they come from our garden and the heart. Oh, and they smell wonderful!

Dogwood Branches

The redtwig dogwood (Cornus sericea) is my favorite winter plant. In fact, it’s arguably more colorful and striking in winter than in summer, at least here. After shedding all leaves, the shrub’s red and grayish-brown branches make an eye-catching statement, especially when the ground is covered in snow. Each spring, I have to shape the shrub and thin it by cutting out the dead, gray wood. I keep most of the trimmings.

The redtwig dogwood is a striking winter plant. And the branches make great arrangements.
The redtwig dogwood is a striking fall and winter plant. And the branches make great arrangements.

At Thanksgiving, I used a few dogwood branches in our table centerpiece, and I’ve added them to a few other projects. My favorite is the small dry arrangement of branches in our home’s entryway that I made our first summer here. So simple, with nothing but a clear vase, decorative rock and dogwood cuttings.

dogwood arrangement
A simple arrangement includes nothing but decorative rock and dogwood branches.
Close-up of dogwood branches.
Close-up of dogwood branches. The mirror reflects the colors (and my mother’s Hummel nativity scene).

My goal this year is to find a few more uses for dogwood branches. Watch out, friends and family!