New Mexico Holiday Tradition: Biscochitos

The New Mexico state cookie is unique, crunchy, slightly sweet and uses an unusual herb. The biscochito (or bizcochito) is also easy to bake. What makes the biscochito different from a typical sugar cookie is incorporation of the herb anise, or aniseed, into the recipe.

Biscochitos, the New Mexico state cookie, have spicy cinnamon, the herb anise and just enough spirits to make the holidays bright.
Biscochitos, the New Mexico state cookie, have spicy cinnamon, the herb anise and just enough spirits to make the holidays bright.

I’ll admit to not favoring these cookies in the past only because I tend to shy from the rather strong flavor of anise, which resembles black licorice. But when I made my own, I found the recipe used just enough anise seed to give the cookies a hint of the herb without overpowering the buttery crunch  or sweet and spicy taste of the cinnamon and sugar sprinkled on top.

With a mixer, it's really easy to cream the sugar and shortening, then stir in anise and a sweet wine or brandy.
With a mixer, it’s really easy to cream the sugar and shortening, then stir in anise and a sweet wine or brandy.

Apparently, anise is used medicinally to help with upset stomachs, and as an expectorant. The plant (Pimpinella anisum) dates back thousands of years, and is native to Egypt and the Near East. Meditteranean plants typically do well in warm, dry climates. In fact, once seedlings are established, anise does best if the roots are allowed to dry between watering. The herb prefers sun, but only grows as an annual.

Anise seeds are similar to fennel. I found these in the Mexican food section of our store.
Anise seeds are similar to fennel. I found these in the Mexican food section of our store.

But back to the cookies, because right now, I’m all about the holidays. I’ll worry about my garden after I open some garden-themed gifts (hint, wink).

I don’t have my own biscochito recipe, but the one I use is from a Southwestern cookbook put out in the 1980s by the Junior League of Albuquerque called Simply Simpatico. It’s a great cookbook in general

Here’s a link to New Mexico Magazine’s recipe, although I used shortening instead of lard, no orange juice, and much less anise. Suffice it to say that if you are not fond of anise, or uncertain, go easy on it your first batch; I suggest a teaspoon of anise for each pound or stick of shortening. The other secret to making these cookies so good is the little bit of liquor. My recipe called for a sweet wine, but several use brandy instead.

The dough is easy to roll out, and you can use a biscuit cutter or fun Christmas shapes.
The dough is easy to roll out, and you can use a biscuit cutter or fun Christmas shapes.

The cookies should be a sort of cross between sugar cookies and shortbread, crumbly but crispy, with plenty of cinnamon and sugar on top.

Cinnamon and sugar set off the crispy biscochito and anise flavoring perfectly.
I cut small and large ones for a little variety, but with a traditional shape. Cinnamon and sugar set off the crispy biscochito and anise flavoring perfectly.

Try this New Mexico favorite and be a hit at your family or office holiday party. Feliz Navidad from New Mexico!