Weeding Through Social Media: Part 2

Earlier this week, I wrote a post on how to be discerning when using social media for gardening tips. A great example just occurred today before I got this post up and running. The National Wildlife Federation, which can have some great advice about attracting wildlife to your garden, for example, posted a story about not raking up leaves. It went viral, and why not?  I mean, who wouldn’t love advice that says you can do less work and help improve the butterfly population?

fallen leaves
Leaves are everywhere, and so is gardening advice.

I had some doubts when I saw the NWF Tweet, because although I know a layer of leaves can help butterflies overwinter, it seemed logical that a leaf layer also helps bad insects overwinter. It’s not like I can go out there and have a conversation with the leaves or pick through the pupae! But a fellow garden writer really had her doubts, especially since when quoted by media, the original post had been taken out of context. Better advice, in addition to that mentioned by Susan Harris, is to repurpose fallen leaves as appropriate. Here’s an article from Bren Haas I retweeted that proposes some good ideas.

And below are some Do’s and Don’ts that I follow, or suggest for gardeners, when using the web and social media for gardening tips, along with some resources.

Do’s:

Understand search results. If you’re not web savvy, learn to recognize the difference between ads and content ranking when searching. Sometimes, maybe you want the ad (such as when you’re looking for your favorite nursery or catalog). Most of the time, however, it’s best to scroll down to the official website or information, not ads. Look beyond the description to the web address below and learn more about the source before clicking. Bookmark (or save to Favorites) sites you might need again.

Verify before following back. Although etiquette “dictates” that you follow back when someone follows you on social media, it’s OK to use some discrimination. When choosing to follow a Pinner or Twitter user, make a quick review of the person or company. Some users are actually empty, having never really pinned, for instance. Some follow indiscriminately to push products and services. And once, I got into a discussion with a Twitter user who is well known in his field, but who follows no one on Twitter but himself/his publication. I’m not going to follow someone who doesn’t take the time to share and learn from others.

red chile ristras
For growing and cooking with red chile, I’ll stick to mostly experts from the Southwest. Image from the National Park Service.

Always check “About” pages on blogs and other websites. A sure sign of a “fake” site to me is one that has no About page or simply restates the home page’s purpose. Any blogger or commercial site should give you some background and reveal a little information about the individual, the company or organization and why they’re qualified to talk about gardening. I look at experience and training, but the details or credentials are less important to me than the fact that the site’s authors are willing to reveal the information. For example, anyone who has been farming organically for 10 years can certainly give me advice for improving my organic vegetable garden. Typically, when researching blog posts, I turn to people with equal or more training and experience than me. But a site with no information signals the unknown, and most likely a content farm or mill or repurposed, even possibly poorly researched or plagiarized, information. Content farms hire lots of freelancers, often inexperienced ones, and pay them poorly to crank out content that ranks well in search engines.

Look for local experts for plant information in particular. If I want deer-resistant plants, for example, I also want to know which ones do best in my zone and with little to no water. Local and regional sources are particularly important when it comes to saving water and xeric planting. Water is not an issue in every part of the country; many xeric plants couldn’t survive in climates with 35 inches of rain a year, and most xeric gardening and landscaping experts live in more arid zones. The same goes for many advice articles, and especially infographics. Most gardening publications and social media posts have an Eastern or Southeastern focus; more people live, garden and publish there. If you run across a planting schedule, be sure to check those dates against your zone or look for one from a local source.

I often verify online information against a combination of garden books from favorite local authors, master gardeners and our state extension office.

gardening books
And though social media and websites are convenient and full of information, you can’t beat some of your go-to local experts in print for gardening insight.

Don’ts:

Don’t believe everything you read. That’s especially true now on Pinterest and some blogs. The more sponsored content takes over social media, the more likely it proliferates in pins and posts. There is plenty of accurate information out there. Use the same tips above to check out sources or double-check information before running with it. Having said that, there are some really clever people out there, so give them a chance once you’ve vetted their validity and relevance. And the leaf example I cited today shows how a credible site such as NWF or sources citing it, should be verified when it comes to gardening advice. If you want to know what kind of food to put in your winter bird feeder, then by all means, count NWF at the top of your list.

Don’t fall for cheesy graphics. This is the latest trend to get social media users to click through. Well-designed graphics can be a sign of a quality site, but many of the new graphic trends remind me of the early days of desktop publishing. Sadly, anyone who could run the software would design flyers, newsletters and other visual materials filled with screaming colors and multiple fonts. I know I am losing this battle as Pinterest and even Twitter look more like scrolling billboards every day. Content is what matters, not screaming headlines. Give a pin or post a chance because of the author and potential relevance.

Don’t fall for sponsored content. When you evaluate sources, check to see whether authorship is assigned and attributed to a particular page or article you find online. I try to only retweet articles from trusted publications and bloggers. There is no reason for an “anonymous” post to appear on a gardening topic; only rely on attributed material. A blogger who reviews a product should reveal that it was provided for free in exchange for the review and should provide a balanced review.

Helpful Resources

I’m sure some will disagree with me on a few of my tips, and social media is a moving target. But for quality information, simply be a discerning user. It’s really quite simple. Here are a few ideas for quality sites; my Resources page has several listed by topic.

Local cooperative extension offices Each state has an extension office, which not only helps farmers and ranchers, but home gardeners as well. Most states also have county extension offices.

Master gardeners. Master gardener programs typically are run by extension programs as well and can be your source for local programs. And master gardeners usually volunteer to answer questions via hotlines, libraries or their websites.

National gardening societies and organizations. If I’m having problems with an orchid or writing for a client about roses, I tend to look for help from national societies whose members are experts on these plants. Most have helpful pages or publications for home gardeners.

Garden bloggers. The National Garden Bureau is a helpful resource, and maintains a list of garden bloggers and other links. Look for garden writers who specialize in your area of interest or concern, or your region. And check out Garden Rant, the source that called out the bad leaf advice I mentioned at the top of this post.

And, in case you want to see who I follow on social media, link to me on Twitter from my feed to the right of this post, or to my Instagram and Pinterest accounts from my Fun Stuff page.