Favorite Green: Arugula, Even the Wild Ones

Arugula, with its bitter flavor, is considered a gourmet green by many and way too bitter by some (namely, my husband). But the green is one of my favorites, partly for the flavor and partly because it’s so easy to grow in containers or in our high desert garden. It also grows wild around our property!

Wild arugula growing in a patch in the orchard. I just want to reach down and eat those bitter leaves!
Wild arugula growing in a patch in the orchard. I just want to reach down and munch on those yummy bitter leaves!

Maybe arugula grows so well here in New Mexico because the plant is native to the Mediterranean. We don’t water the wild bunches that grow near our house or out in our orchard, and I have no idea how they came to be there. I just know that I kept getting a whiff of arugula when mowing in certain portions of the lawn. This year, conditions were such that I was able to spot the leaves and have a bite. By late summer, the yellow flowers followed and I have asked Tim to join me in not mowing a few bunches. I prefer to grow a milder variety for my salads, but I like having the wild plants around for their scent and appearance. And there are much worse plants spreading in our yard than these tasty greens!

The wild bunches later flowered, making them pretty to smell and look at.
The wild bunches later flowered, making them pretty to smell and look at.

The taste of arugula is strong, but I love to add it to spinach or mesclun mixes, or really any greens. In fact, traditional and tangy mesclun mixes usually include arugula. The green is particularly good with blue cheese dressing and can spice up a chicken or turkey sandwich!

A single leaf of Astro Organic arugula. Image courtesy of the National Garden Bureau.
A single leaf of Astro Organic arugula. Image courtesy of the National Garden Bureau.

Baby arugula is harvested when the leaves are younger, and offers a milder flavor than mature plants. Like most greens, arugula grows best in your garden in cooler spring or fall weather. You can typically harvest the greens within 4 weeks. And if you let it go to flower, the flavor might become too intense. Most garden varieties of arugula have edible, attractive white flowers with purple veining. The wild variety has yellow flowers.

Arugula in our garden in early summer. It's best to cut from the outside. I also plan to cover it a little longer this year to keep bugs off.
Arugula in our garden in early summer. It’s best to cut from the outside. I plan to cover the young plants a little longer next year to keep bugs off.

Arugula also is called rocket or rocket salad. Some people use arugula more as an herb, sprinkling it sparingly on dishes for the peppery flavor. All fresh greens are healthy, but apparently arugula is packed with vitamins and antioxidants. To me, it’s packed with flavor and aroma!

Learn more about growing arugula in your garden in this article from Bonnie Plants, and check out Johnny’s Seeds for several varieties of wild arugula.