Five New Plants for the Drought-tolerant Garden

Breeders, growers and retailers are on the ball in 2015, coming up with plenty of new plants to add variety and year-round interest to drought-tolerant gardens. I picked five favorite introductions I recently learned about to share. They’re just the tip of the melting iceberg. There are plenty more on the way, but we’re planning on placing some of these in our garden (or already have!)

sunset western garden collection Meerlo
Sunset’s Meerlo lavender has the fragrant scent you’d expect and the variegated leaves you wouldn’t expect. If you live where winter lows dip below 18 degrees F, it’s best grown in a container or as an annual. Image courtesy of Sunset Western Garden Collection.

Meerlo lavender (Lavender allardi ‘Meerlo’ PPAF). I got to see and touch this fun new variegated lavender from the Sunset Western Garden Collection last month. Unfortunately, it’s only hardy in Sunset zones 9 and 10 (or roughly where winter lows dip no lower than 18 to 31 degrees Fahrenheit). Step up, California gardeners – this one’s perfect for your garden and herb beds. Or replace high-water hedges and grassy medians with a hedge made of several aromatic Meerlo lavenders with their evergreen foliage. Of course, you can also plant it in a container, which I might have to do. Like all lavender, it needs full sun or only partial shade and little water. It will grow to nearly 3 feet high and wide.

Luminous Pineleaf Beardtongue (Penstemon pinifolius ‘Luminous’). Any penstemon is a perfect addition to a drought-tolerant garden. You’ll be sure to enjoy hummingbirds maneuvering into the tiny flowers of the pineleaf penstemon. I have yet to see the new Luminous penstemon from High Country Gardens, but after hearing it described, I can’t wait. It’s evergreen, low growing and has bright orange flowers with yellow throats that bloom from late spring until early summer. This native perennial loves sun and looks great along the edges of rock gardens and terraced steps. The new variety grows in zones 5 through 9 and to about 8 inches tall and over a foot wide.

pinelead penstemon in rock garden
Our pineleaf penstemon grows near our other favorite drought-tolerant planting — rocks — and before our culinary sage. The new Luminous form should be a stunner.

Thin Man Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans Thin Man PPAF). Another great introduction from New Mexico’s own High Country Gardens, this is a selected form of a native Indiangrass. With blue, upright foliage and late summer blooms that turn bronze, this ornamental grass is selected specifically for dry, windy growing conditions faced in New Mexico and other arid regions of the Southwest. Consider it as the perfect drought-tolerant and year-round focal point for a fence or wall. It can reach heights of 6 feet and more than 2 feet in width. It’s deer resistant and hardy in zones 4 through 9.

Thin man indian grass
Thin Man Indiangrass can grow to 6 feet high. It would look gorgeous blowing in the breeze all year long before a fence or wall of your home. Image courtesy of High Country Gardens.

Brakelights Red Yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora ‘Perpa’). Maybe you like that upright form of ornamental grass, but a little more color. Then this yucca is the plant for you. I love the clever name! Yuccas send up stalks in summer with red flowers and southern California’s Monrovia says this new yucca is compact and a particularly prolific bloomer. We couldn’t wait to add the red to our garden, and planted one already. We’re holding on to another in case the first one doesn’t get established before the freeze. But it’s doing well. You can also plant several in a border for lots of red or the interest of the nearly overlapping foliage.  The yucca needs at least 6 hours of sun a day and is drought tolerant, but might bloom better with a little more moisture. It’s hardy in zones 5 through 10.

brakelights red yucca
Here’s our backup Brakelights red yucca. One is in the ground and doing great. I can’t wait to see both pop with bright red blooms.

BabyJade boxwood (Buxus microphulla var. japonica ‘Grejade’). I never really thought of boxwood as a plant for Southwestern gardens, but there was one by our north-facing front porch when we bought this house, and it’s a great evergreen shrub to welcome people to our home. In fact, the plant does surprisingly well, considering its shady, northern exposure. The new Baby Jade introduction from Garden Debut is hardy to zone 5, deer tolerant and drought tolerant. It’s also a compact shrub that reaches about 3 feet in height and width. Boxwoods grow slowly and I enjoy occasionally shaping ours. This might not be the look you want in the middle of a xeric garden, but it’s a perfect plant for entryways, foundation plantings and small patio gardens.

boxwood in new mexico
This is our boxwood, which has proved to be drought tolerant and hardy to a cooler microclimate than our zone 6B. The Baby Jade form is compact and has petite leaves.

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