Favorite Easy-to-Grow Vegetable: Green Beans

I love growing green beans so much that I went a little crazy this year. I still love to grow and eat them, but please, come take some off my hands!

fresh-green-beans
These are just a few of the green beans I picked the other morning. Plenty more where those came from! And where they’re going — to friends or the freezer.

Actually, one of the reasons I love growing beans is that they are so easy to preserve. Although you can preserve them with canning, they are so darned easy to freeze that canning seems like a crazy idea unless you don’t have an extra freezer…or two.

Planting beans

This year, I planted two types of Phaseolus vulgaris: A French filet bush bean and a Blue Lake pole bean. Both are warm season plants, listing about a 58 to 60 day seed-to-maturity date. We had a really good germination rate when planting about eight days after the last frost. I planted four more beans three weeks later for a succession. Next year, I will wait a few more weeks for that second planting because all of the plants are mature right now and I have enough green beans for a small city. The alternative is fewer plants in each succession, three weeks apart. It’s just important to plant the final wave of plants so they can mature and produce before the first fall frost. I know the pole beans require room to roam, but I now prefer them to the bush plants for bean production, plant health and for gardener ergonomics.

The package recommended thinning the beans to every 4 to 6 inches. I think I will give the ones on the end a little more room next year for trellising. Beans need warm, loose, fertile soil to germinate and thrive. They have to be directly sowed, not transplanted.

Green bean care

We used an inexpensive studded metal fence post and square welded metal fencing system to support the beans. I’ve mentioned in a previous post how the mature beans, which face south, serve as shade for lettuce plants on the north side of the fence. I can still easily harvest the beans on the north side without stepping on the lettuce, at least if I am paying attention.

green beans on fence trellis
The beans run along the middle fence, with a cucumbers on the end and melons along the south fence.

Water beans regularly and early in the day from below the foliage if at all possible. Wet leaves can cause disease such as white mold. Beans are susceptible to aphids, and I’m sure I had some because I also had ants on and around mine. A fine, hard spray of water, repeated a few days later, can wash off aphids. But since you don’t want to wet the bean plant’s leaves, it’s best to spray them early in the morning on a sunny, warm day.

Harvesting and storing green beans

Harvesting green beans is one of my favorite garden activities. I think that is one reason I planted so many! I love finding a perfectly sized bean hiding under the leaves or on the other side of the fence. I have found they’re easiest to pick in early morning or late in the day when there is no sun in my eyes. It helps to look up when bending low to spot beans hiding under leaves; I hate finding one I have missed that is too mature. You can spot the mature beans by their length and the swollen, rolling shape. Pick them before they get to that point. That usually means harvesting at least twice a week; I try to pick every other day during the height of the plants’ production. I hang a bag on my arm to free up both hands so I don’t damage the stalks or smaller beans as I pull.

green beans on the stalk
These beans were hiding under a bunch of leaves, and the beans look like stalks. But when you find a handful at just the right stage, total bliss.

As I said, green beans are really easy to freeze. I rinse, then blanch and cool the beans. Most articles recommend snapping the beans before blanching and freezing, and I am sure there is a reason for this. I don’t snap before freezing, but don’t take my word for it because I am not a food safety expert. Blanching involves boiling the beans for just two minutes or so – too long makes them limp and depletes their high nutritional value. Immediately place the beans in clean ice water, then spread them out on a cookie sheet or similar tray (I line mine with paper towels). I let them sit just long enough to drain on the towels, then put them in the freezer no longer than overnight. The next day, I put them into a plastic bag and mark them with the date.

frozen green beans
Another package of beans is ready for the freezer. I like them steamed or sauteed with garlic, lemon, parmesan and pine nuts.

Apparently, frozen beans also lose some of their nutritional value after a few months in the freezer. I’ll still take the nutrition that’s left over anything I could buy in the store or yukky canned ones!