Favorite Xeric Plant: Butterfly Bush

What’s not to love about a plant named for the butterflies it attracts? The butterfly bush (Buddleia) has much more to offer as well. It also attracts bees and plenty of hummingbirds. The plant is a long-lasting perennial in several zones and it’s easy to care for.

butterfly on buddleia
A butterfly enjoys nectar from a purple buddleia bloom.

To me, the buddleia is like a magical shrub. There’s something kind of free-flowing, almost messy to its shape, and to how rapidly it grows on its woody base. Despite its sometimes uneven appearance, the buddleia makes a perfect centerpiece or backdrop in a xeric garden. Ours sits in the center of a forefront bed, where we can watch hummingbirds and butterflies visit from our patio, but I have seen the attractive bush used well against walls and walkways throughout New Mexico.

buddleia in bloom
The full butterfly bush in bloom in July, in zone 6B.

About Buddleia

There are several cultivars of butterfly bush, and several colors of the showy flowers. A dwarf buddleia usually reaches about three to five feet in height, but the fountain buddleia grows up to 12 feet tall, is adapted to higher altitudes (above 6,500 feet) and has longer flower spikes than the typical six to eight inches. Most of the New Mexico buddleias bloom in variations of lavender, plum or purple. And I find the foliage attractive, having a kind of muted, silvery-green color and texture that brings to mind giant sage leaves.

Buddleia bush bloom
I love the shape of the large flowers. Hummingbirds circle them to retrieve nectar from individual blooms.

Caring for Butterfly Bushes

Buddleia is a drought-tolerant plant that should only need supplemental watering until established or when temperatures are consistently above 85 degrees and, of course, rain is scarce. I seldom or never water mine except after cutting it back in late winter/early spring.

Though you don’t have to deadhead the blooms, you can trim off the seedheads once they’re spent to encourage new flowering. I usually don’t bother, as my plant seems to produce for most of the season. I just give mine that drastic haircut in late winter as soon as I see a little bit of new growth on the bottom stems; it shoots up in height as soon as temperatures warm.

pruned butterfly bush in early spring
Here’s the same bush as shown above, in early spring (seriously, in the lower right corner near the sundial). It loves the heavy prune!

Nearly every buddleia is hardy in zones 5a to 9, depending on the cultivar and the microclimate you place it in. I recommend talking with a nursery representative or a landscape designer before selecting a buddleia to make sure you choose the best size for your location or vice versa. If I didn’t cut ours back nearly to the ground each year, it would block most of our garden and view!