Xeriscaping Strategy: Natural Hardscaping

Any home gardener can create an attractive landscape without filling the entire lawn with lush turf and plants. Having said that, you can achieve a lush lawn with low-water plantings. Add some hardscaping, or built and paved areas, and you’ve got interest and function, a palette for the plants’ colors and textures.

cosmos and rocks in garden
These tiny cosmos flowers came up from seed. They might have gotten pulled in another spot, but they look so good contrasted against these large rocks.

But here’s the rub – and this month’s rant about people who take xeriscaping to the extreme – hardscaping does not mean that you tear out every living blade of grass, and kill (intentionally or unintentionally) every root of every living plant in your yard. In other words, don’t replace the entire landscape with pavement and rocks. In the end, you and your house will be hot, and the only roots that will survive – somehow – will be those of annoying weeds.

You can use rocks quite effectively in a xeric landscape, along with other natural elements. I use the term “natural hardscaping” because if you use found elements from nature, you spend less money and maintain the sort of natural look that many xeric landscapes feature so well. In other words, store-bought pavers have their place, as do concrete and gravel. But I believe they have limited, specific uses, and it’s more fun to add some found elements, such as interesting rocks to your garden.

rocks in xeric garden
This large xeric garden has pavers lining the outside, but a natural rock wall along the inside.

You don’t have to water rocks, and they can fill or delineate spaces or offset and draw attention to xeric plants. Other great found objects are pieces of wood from old trees (or driftwood), seashells and old metal objects or collectibles that can weather the outdoors. From a practical standpoint, you can use rocks to help well or shore up areas to control drainage, which is a great xeriscaping strategy.

Here are a few tips for using natural hardscaping to complement your xeric garden:

  • Rounded plants can soften the edges of hardscape materials, such as patio corners or steps. And shorter, round rocks look great behind tall, straight grasses, for instance.
using rocks in a xeric garden
This large, round rock looks great behind yellow evening primrose. The solar light bounces off of it at night.
  • Pea gravel is a great hardscaping element. It’s easier to walk on than larger rock gravel and can serve as mulch for plants that need little water and plenty of heat. You probably want to lay some landscape fabric under the pea gravel and be sure to layer it on thickly to prevent weeds, though.
  • Use your creativity, adding hardscape elements to make or line paths, for example. You might find rocks or leftover flagstone pieces large enough to bury for stepping stones. Tim placed a large, nearly flat rock under our faucet as a sort of foundation and splash guard.
rock bench in wall
This is a bench in a rock garden made from a huge found slab. It’s functional, and breaks up the round shape.
  • After making any change that replaces turf or plants with hardscaping, be sure to modify drainage and sprinkler systems to avoid wasting water.
  • Although wood can work well in the garden, it can sometimes rot or invite pests, such as carpenter ants. So try to use it where it can stay relatively dry or off the ground. Treated wood, such as old railroad ties, fares better.
rocks and wood in xeric garden
Creeping sedum planted in old fencepost, complete with rusted barbed wire. Rocks line a cactus area behind it.
  • Rock gardens look best when they appear as rocks might in nature. Burying a large rock a few inches down, and even slightly askew, looks much better than just setting it on top of the ground. Just like with plant selections, mix up rock colors, textures and sizes.

3 Replies to “Xeriscaping Strategy: Natural Hardscaping”

  1. Lovely idea for the use of rocks.. my backyard is full of them just underneath the ground. I’ll be putting in a few of those solar lights near the rocks too..

    Take care and happy blogging to ya, from Laura ~

      1. Teresa Odle, that is so right ~ I usually lay then along the bottom edge of my fence, but after seeing the lovely arrangement you did with your rocks, I’ve seen them in a new light..

        Take care and thank you for the comments..

        Laura ~

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